Former Macron aide Benalla charged over illegal diplomatic passport use

A former top security aide to French President Emmanuel Macron, who was at the heart of a scandal this summer, was charged Friday with the illegal use of diplomatic passports.

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Trump and N. Korea's Kim Jong-un to hold second summit next month

President Donald Trump will meet for the second time with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in February, the White House said Friday, after a top general from Pyongyang paid a rare visit to Washington.

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Colombia car bomb attack reflects 'internal tensions within ELN rebel group'

The Colombian government says that the ELN rebel group was responsible for the car bomb attack on a police academy in Bogota on Thursday. The attack killed at least 21 and injured dozens. The ELN has not released a statement or claimed responsibility for the attack. FRANCE 24 spoke to Kyle Johnson, a Colombia expert at the International Crisis Group, an NGO that carries out research on international conflict. He told FRANCE 24 that the attack reflects “internal tensions” within the group. The ELN signed a unilateral truce with the country’s authorities in December last year, which Johnson says may have angered some of the more militant wings of the ELN. The sudden attack makes it seem unlikely that the government can restart peace talks with the group. The car bombing was Colombia’s worst in almost 16 years, and has revived fears that more attacks could be coming as the conflict between the government and insurgents intensifies.

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Russia says it will allow German, French experts to monitor Kerch Strait

Russia on Friday said it had already agreed that France and Germany would monitor shipping traffic in the Kerch Strait following a naval confrontation between Moscow and Kiev in November, but that foreign observers had yet to arrive.

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Kurdish YPG militia stuck between Turkey and the US

The Kurdish YPG militia is stuck between a rock and a hard place… On one side, Turkey, which considers the militia a terrorist branch of the outlawed PKK, the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, and on the other, the United States, which has supported the YPG in its efforts to dislodge the Islamic State Group from its positions in Syria. But US President Donald Trump made a shock decision last month to withdraw all American troops from Syria, leaving the YPG high and dry and having to face an increasingly hostile Ankara on its own. Despite the US decision, YPG continues to fight the remaining pockets of the Islamic State Group in the country. President Trump affirms that the Islamic State Group has been completely driven out of the country, despite evidence to the contrary. FRANCE 24 spoke to members of the militia about the tense situation.

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